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Police reject assault rate claims

Police reject assault rate claims. Police say they have responded to more than 1,100 sexual assaults over the past two years and only 1.4 percent of them have resulted in a conviction.

As of March 5th, there were 13 cases pending against 14 people who allegedly sexually assaulted people at three parks in Minneapolis.

No sexual assaults had been reported by this date to the police department. “I think the real question is, are we taking this seriously?” asked Lt. John Doucette, a spokesman for the city’s sexual assault unit. “I think we should.”
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That’s an assumption backed by Lt. Mike Schadler, deputy chief with the Minneapolis Police Department.

“We continue to take our own complaints very seriously,” Schadler said. “We don’t want our officers getting out on their officers, which has occurred in the past. We are also constantly evaluating how we can better police our community, and to my mind is one of the things that we should be doing, improving our community.”

Officers are trained to be suspicious if they are unsure of someone’s intentions. They also are expected to act more aggressively when a suspect is armed and threatening and to take appropr??????iate action without fear of excessive force.

The use of firearms is banned in some parks and in some recreation areas. The parks also are subject to a code of conduct that requires officers to be on duty during work hours and to exercise discretion when interacting with people of any race, gender or religion.

The department also prohibits the use of personal weapons unless in self-defense.

At the three parks, officers did not report a single allegation of a sexual assault, but about 50 calls to the city’s sexual assault hotline went unreturned. The hotline received one report about an alleged assault on March 6.

No one from the Minneapolis Police Department spoke on behalf of the department or could explain why complaints about sexual assault are being ignored. The department referred questions to the city’s public safety department. A spokesman declined to provide statistics.

The mayor’s office says all complaints are treated “case by case,” and officials aren’t able to estimate how many of the roughly 1,100 calls went unreturned.

A spokesman for the mayor’s office said the city would like t??????o see the issue addressed faster.

“We have some real challenges for the police in Minneapolis, but we’ve got more resources and resources to go around when we need them in particular areas, like in the sexual assault center o